This recipe is for vegan fudge made the authentic old-fashioned way!  Rich, creamy, melt-in-your-mouth chocolate fudge, like the kind that you would find in a fudge shop! 

This isn’t 2 or 3-ingredient fudge made of melted chocolate chips, or healthy fudge made from nut butter.  This fudge uses a candy-making process and is cooked on the stovetop, but I promise the little extra effort will be well worth it when you taste your first bite!

Four pieces of vegan fudge stacked on top of each other with a purple flower next to it.

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I grew up with a mother who is a serious chocoholic and her chocolate of choice was old-fashioned fudge.  She has made at least a batch a week ever since I can remember. 

When I went vegan, I was scared that I would never be able to enjoy her fudge again, but she simply made it with soy milk and vegan butter, and it came out better than with cow’s milk.  (Even she admits that her old fudge recipe is better when made with soy milk.)

❔ Why make this recipe

Chocolate fudge made on the stovetop is simply delicious.  It’s slightly dry to the touch, but the second it touches your mouth it starts to melt and you know that you are biting into something special. 

It’s a taste that will bring you back to bake sales, grandma’s kitchen, fudge shops, or Christmas cookie trays from when you were a kid.

Many squares of vegan fudge scattered around on top of white parchment paper with some purple flowers around.

🌟 Troubleshooting

This old-fashioned recipe produces the best-tasting fudge, but it’s not an easy no-fail method.  If you follow the recipe exactly and use a good candy thermometer, it’s actually fairly simple, but I had many batches fail before I realized that my thermometer was not calibrated correctly.

Candy making is a very precise process and you will need a good candy thermometer to make sure that it sets correctly.  However, I must tell you that even with a candy thermometer, the fudge will come out differently every time depending on the weather.  Even though my mother has made hundreds of batches, it still sets up differently every time she makes it depending on the humidity.

You will have the best results if you make it on cool dry days with low humidity.  However, my mother and I have had many rainy days that just called for a batch of fudge and when it doesn’t set up firm enough, we call it Spoon Fudge and we enjoy it just the same.

A stack of three pieces of classic vegan fudge stacked on top of each other with more pieces scattered around.

🧾 Ingredients and substitutions

  • Sugar – use dry light-colored sugar like organic cane sugar.  Don’t try to swap this out for a healthier alternative.  This is not healthy low-sugar fudge.
  • Cocoa Powder – any good quality cocoa powder will work.
  • Salt – for flavor.
  • Plant-Based Milk – I usually use soymilk, but oat milk or Ripple are also good choices.  You want to use plant milk that has fat and protein content similar to cow’s milk, so almond or rice milk are not great choices.
  • Vegan Butter – any high-quality vegan margarine will work well, you don’t want to use cheap brands of margarine that are watery when they melt.  You can also use the stick version of my homemade vegan butter if you wish.
  • Vanilla Extract – for flavor.

🔪 Helpful tools

  • A candy thermometer – make sure you have a good quality candy thermometer to give you an accurate temperature reading.
  • A medium-sized saucepan with a heavy bottom.  (Your fudge mixture will bubble up and rise to almost triple the amount when it’s boiling, so make sure you use a 4-quart pan or larger.)
  • A wooden spoon to stir the fudge.  You don’t want to use a metal spoon or whisk.
  • An 8-inch square pan or a pie dish will also work.
  • Parchment paper allows you to lift it out of the pan and cut it into nice squares, but you can also spread a little butter on the pan if you don’t have parchment paper.

🥄 How to make vegan fudge

Step 1 – Line an 8-inch square pan with parchment paper. (Give the pan a little spray of oil before setting it on the parchment to make it stick to the pan and not move around on you.)

Step 2 – Put the sugar, cocoa powder, salt, and soy milk in a medium saucepan with a heavy bottom.

Pouring soy milk into dry ingredients to make dairy-free fudge.

Step 3 – Turn on the heat to medium, and stir frequently until it comes to a strong boil. (this will take about 15 minutes)  It will get very foamy looking.

The vegan fudge when it first starts to boil looking light colored and foamy.

Step 4 – Turn down the heat until it continues at a slow boil and stir it occasionally until it reaches 234° F (112.2° C) on a candy thermometer. (this will take about 15 more minutes) The syrup will appear darker and get lower in the pan when it’s close to 234° F. Watch it closely once it gets to about 230° F, it can go to 234° F quickly.

The fudge sauce once it has reached 230°F, lower in the pan and darker.
The fudge syrup at about 230° F.

Step 5 – Immediately remove it from the heat (set it on a cool burner) and add the vegan butter and vanilla (don’t stir or move it, let the butter melt and float to the top).

Vegan butter and vanilla extract in the fudge sauce before cooling and stirring.

Step 6 – Once the pan is cool enough to keep your hand on the side of it for about 5 seconds without needing to take it away, it is time to stir the fudge. (This will take about 15-20 minutes after cooking)

Step 7 – Sit down and set the saucepan on your lap (to give you leverage and keep your arm from getting too tired) (you can put a tea towel under the pan so it’s not too hot on your legs) and stir well until all of the butter and vanilla are incorporated and it starts to thicken slightly or lose its gloss.

Step 8 – Once it starts to thicken or get less shiny, immediately pour it into the parchment-lined pan and smooth it out evenly.

Step 9 – Allow it to cool to room temperature before taking it out of the pan and cutting it into squares.

The vegan fudge on parchment paper before cutting it.

👩🏻‍🍳 Pro Tips

  • Make sure to use a pan with a heavy bottom so it heats evenly.
  • Use a wooden spoon not a metal spoon or a whisk to stir the fudge.
  • Keep a close eye on the thermometer.  The second that it reaches 234° F (112.2° C), turn off the heat and remove it from the burner.  (Don’t just turn it off and let it continue to sit on a hot burner!)
  • Don’t let it cool too much before you begin beating in the butter and vanilla or it will set in the pan.
Cutting the chocolate fudge into squares after it cools.

⛰️ High altitude instructions

For every one thousand feet of altitude above sea level, deduct 2 degrees from 234° F. For example, if you live 5,000 feet above sea level, you would deduct 10 degrees and only cook your fudge to 224° F.

🥡 Storage

Wrap the fudge in parchment paper and store it in an airtight container on the countertop for 1 week or in the fridge for up to 3 weeks.  You can also seal it in a freezer bag for up to 3 months.

This fudge makes a great special treat for holidays and special occasions!  It’s perfect for a homemade gift of chocolates for Christmas or Valentine’s Day!  You can check out more about how I do this in my post about homemade vegan chocolates.

If the process of making homemade vegan fudge overwhelms you or you want a healthy alternative, my healthy almond butter freezer fudge is delicious, super easy to make, and is made in minutes with only 3 ingredients!

A close up of a piece of old fashioned vegan fudge with a bite taken out of it.

📌 Be sure to follow me on Pinterest for new vegan recipes!

📋 Vegan fudge recipe

A stack of three pieces of vegan chocolate fudge with a purple flower and more pieces of fudge around it.
4.86 from 7 rating

Vegan Fudge

A classic homemade old fashioned fudge recipe made vegan.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups sugar
  • 2/3 cup cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cup soy milk, (or oat milk or Ripple)

Add in after cooking

Equipment

  • A candy thermometer – make sure you have a good quality candy thermometer to give you an accurate temperature reading.
  • A medium-sized saucepan with a heavy bottom.  (Your fudge mixture will bubble up and rise to almost triple the amount when it's boiling, so make sure you use a 4-quart pan or larger.)
  • A wooden spoon to stir the fudge.  You don't want to use a metal spoon or whisk.
  • An 8-inch square pan or a pie dish will also work.
  • Parchment paper allows you to lift it out of the pan and cut it into nice squares, but you can also spread a little butter on the pan if you don't have parchment paper.

Instructions
 

  • Line an 8-inch square pan with parchment paper. (Give the pan a little spray oil before setting in the parchment to make it stick to the pan and not move around on you.)
  • Put the sugar, cocoa powder, salt, and soy milk in a medium saucepan with a heavy bottom.
  • Turn on the heat to medium, and stir frequently until it comes to a strong boil. (this will take about 15 minutes)  It will get very foamy looking.
    The vegan fudge when it first starts to boil looking light colored and foamy.
  • Turn down the heat until it continues at a slow boil and stir it occasionally until it reaches 234° F (112.2° C) on a candy thermometer. (this will take about 15 more minutes) The syrup will appear darker and get lower in the pan when it's close to 234° F. Watch it closely once it gets to about 230° F, it can go to 234° F quickly.
    The fudge sauce once it has reached 230°F, lower in the pan and darker.
  • Immediately remove it from the heat (set it on a cool burner) and add the vegan butter and vanilla (don't stir or move it, let the butter melt and float to the top).
    Vegan butter and vanilla extract in the fudge sauce before cooling and stirring.
  • Once the pan is cool enough to keep your hand on the side of it for about 5 seconds without needing to take it away, it is time to stir the fudge. (This will take about 15-20 minutes after cooking)
  • Sit down and set the saucepan on your lap (to give you leverage and keep your arm from getting too tired) (you can put a tea towel under the pan so it's not too hot on your legs) and stir well until all of the butter and vanilla are incorporated and it starts to thicken slightly or lose its gloss.
  • Once it starts to thicken or get less shiny, immediately pour it into the parchment-lined pan and smooth it out evenly.
  • Allow it to cool to room temperature before taking it out of the pan and cutting it into squares.

Notes

  • Make sure to use a pan with a heavy bottom so it heats evenly.
  • Use a wooden spoon not a metal spoon or a whisk to stir the fudge.
  • Keep a close eye on the thermometer.  The second that it reaches 234 F (112.2° C), turn off the heat and remove it from the burner.  (Don’t just turn it off and let it continue to sit on a hot burner!)
  • Don’t let it cool too much before you begin beating in the butter and vanilla or it will set in the pan.
For High Altitude
  • For every one thousand feet of altitude above sea level, deduct 2 degrees from 234° F. For example, if you live 5,000 feet above sea level, you would deduct 10 degrees and only cook your fudge to 224° F.
Serving: 1square, Calories: 123kcal, Carbohydrates: 27g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 2g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 72mg, Potassium: 57mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 25g, Vitamin A: 147IU, Vitamin C: 1mg, Calcium: 24mg, Iron: 1mg
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